|  HOME  |  MEMBERS  |  VERNON COMMUNITY PLAN  |  SERVICES  |  NEWS  |  VERNON PUBLIC SCHOOLS  |  TOWN of VERNON  | 
 

 

The Web 1Vernon.org only
211
1-STOP

ACRONYMS

DEFINITIONS

BASIC NEEDS
CALENDAR/MEETINGS
COLLABORATIVES
DCF
FAITH-COMMUNITY
HEALTH
Hunger Action Team (HAT) BEYOND FOOD DRIVES)

LIFE SPAN

JOBS
MAP
NEIGHBORHOOD ADVOCATE
PROGRAM
NEWS
RESEARCH
SERVICES
SPORTS
SUPPORT GROUPS
TASK FORCES

FOOD SECURITY-H.A.T.

HOMELESSNESS

MENTORING

JOBS

VERNON COMMUNITY PLAN


Our goal: “All Vernon children birth to eighteen are safe, healthy and productive.”

VERNON
MULTI-DISCIPLINARY
TEAM
VERNON SCHOOL
READINESS
COUNCIL
 
    VERNON COMMUNITY PLAN

Our goal: “All Vernon children birth to eighteen are safe, healthy and productive.”

 

 

 

Using Results-Based Accountability (RBA) (Click for RBA Terms)   

“How much did we do?” 

“How well did we do it?” 

        and most importantly, 

“Is anyone better off?”

 

http://www.discovery.wcgmf.org/partners/communities/vernon 

Discovery Work

Grant Option: 
Plan Implementation

Population Results Statement: 
All Vernon children birth to 8 are safe, healthy and productive.


Community Demographics

Population: 
29,179
DRG: 
G
District Designation: 
Competitive
ELL Percent: 
2%

Community Contacts

Primary Community Contact: 

Alan Slobodien
860-870-3557 | aslobodien@vernon-ct.gov

- See more at: http://www.discovery.wcgmf.org/partners/communities/vernon#sthash.wd1naA1D.dpuf 

Collaboration proliferates in Vernon. The Vernon Community Network, a consortium of 40 public education, non-profit, faith-based and government organizations, completed a two-year community planning process in 2011. The Vernon Comm

- See more at: http://www.discovery.wcgmf.org/partners/communities/vernon#sthash.wd1naA1D.dpuf

Vernon

Collaboration proliferates in Vernon. The Vernon Community Network, a consortium of 40 public education, non-profit, faith-based and government organizations, completed a two-year community planning process in 2011. The Vernon Community Plan results statement, “All Vernon children birth to eighteen are safe, healthy and productive” was rolled out to the broader community in June 2011 where over 150 community leaders, residents and change leaders were in attendance. Notably present were DCF Deputy Commissioner Janice Gruendel, Vice President of Programs at Hartford Foundation, Maria Mojica and Executive Director of the Wm. Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund, David Nee. These change leaders joined the Mayor of Vernon, Superintendent of Schools and a host of dedicated policy makers, administrators, service providers and interested citizens in kicking off the community plan. As a result of this two-year planning process, Hartford Foundation and the Graustein Memorial Fund partnered in providing over $300,000 in multi-year grants to support plan implementation.

The plan is organized in three sections: Birth to Eight, Youth 9-18 and Community. The Vernon School Readiness Council, the Local Early Childhood Council, excitedly signed on to navigate the birth to eight section of the plan and pledged to work on the following headline indicators: Non-Adequate Prenatal Care; Child Abuse/Neglect; High Quality Preschool Experience and 3rd Grade CMT Reading. The VSRC is also engaged in turning the curve on chronic absenteeism and summer learning loss as Vernon is one of the CT Grade Level Reading communities. There is tremendous energy and effort being exerted in Vernon. For example, a local business partner funded the Vernon Bookmobile that distributed 2,741 books to elementary aged youth in the summer of 2012; an increase of 400% from the year before. Partnership development continues at a steady pace as the full-time Implementation Coordinator deftly outreaches to all sectors of the community. 

For more information about Vernon’s community plan, contact Michelle Hill, Implementation Coordinator.

Discovery Work
Grant Option: Plan Implementation

Population Results Statement: 
All Vernon children birth to 8 are safe, healthy and productive.


Community Demographics
Population: 29,179
DRG: G
District Designation: Competitive
ELL Percent: 2%

Community Contacts
Primary Community Contact: Alan Slobodien
860-870-3557 | aslobodien@vernon-ct.gov
- See more at: http://www.discovery.wcgmf.org/partners/communities/vernon#sthash.wd1naA1D.dpuf



Elements of a Community Plan 

http://www.discovery.wcgmf.org/elements-community-plan

 
The core elements of a comprehensive community plan combine the Community Decision Making and Results Based Accountability components listed below.  Attention to these elements is important whether a community plan is being developed, enhanced or implemented.

Population Result

A population result reflects conditions of well-being for children birth to age eight in terms that residents and families can understand. The population result is not about programs or agencies and may include several domains such as health, ready for school, succeeding in school, and strong families. A population result is about the quality of life the community desires for all of its children.


Indicators

Indicators are measures that help quantify the achievement of a population result. They answer the question, "How would we recognize these results in measurable terms if we fell over them?" So, for example, the rate of low-birth weight babies helps quantify whether we're achieving healthy births.  Third grade reading scores help quantify whether children are succeeding in school today, and may reflect how ready they were for Kindergarten and how well the school system is contributing toward their learning.

Needs Assessment

The needs assessment is an analysis of baseline data or the trend line of an indicator. It identifies the causes or contributors to the current condition to help tell the story behind the baseline. The story draws from a variety of sources, including parent perception as well as data gathered by providers, school systems, child health and other institutions.

Strategies

Strategies are coherent sets of actions that have a reasonable chance of improving results by turning the curve on one or more key indicators.  Strategies are made up of our best thinking about what works, and they include the contributions of many partners. No single action by any one agency can create the improved results we want and need. Programs are not themselves strategies; they are specific ways of implementing strategies. For example, a strategy of family support may engage the Nurturing Families Network program, which targets new parents at risk of abusing or neglecting their newborn child.

Performance Measures & Data Systems

Performance measures can tell how well public and private programs and agencies are working and if clients or customers of the service are better off. Performance measures are the means by which a community collaborative holds systems and organizations accountable for progress and results. There should be measures in each domain including health, family support, and early care and education.

Local Financing

A transparent financing plan promotes collective accountability for results among community partners and institutions, and projects the full cost of implementing the plan over time. The financing strategy aligns existing state and local resources to the plan strategies, identifies funds for potential reallocation, and specifies the level of new investments needed to “turn the curve” on the indicators specified in the community plan.- See more at: http://www.discovery.wcgmf.org/elements-community-plan#sthash.UbPiJpcf.dpuf

 



Review of the Vernon Community Plan; Two Years Later!

June 26, 2013
6-8 pm at the Vernon Senior Center

Vernon_Comm_Plan/THE_VERNON_COMMUNITY_PLAN_June_26-2.pptx_Gs.pdf

Vernon_Comm_Plan/VCN_Community_Plan-Oct-03-2011.wmv

Vernon_Comm_Plan/9.22.11_VCP-_Final_Narrated_Power_Point-Show-.ppsx

The VCN Vernon Community Plan

Our goal: “All Vernon children birth to eighteen are safe, healthy and productive.”

The complete 83 page plan, 
released on June 14, 2011
The VCN Vernon Community Plan
General Introduction
Pages 1-8
VCP/1-8-General-Introduction.pdf
Birth to 8 Section
Pages 9-28
VCP/9-28-Children-Ages_Birth-8.pdf
9 years - 18 years Section
Pages 29-42 
VCP/29-42-Youth-Ages_9-18.pdf
Community Section
Pages 43-49
VCP/43-49-Community.pdf
Focus Group Results
Pages 50-51
VCP/50-51-Focus_Group_Results.pdf
Implementation & Accountability Section
Pages 52-76

VCP/52-76-Implementation_Accountability.pdf

Appendix - Fiscal Scan - Focus Group
Pages 77-83
VCP/77-83-APPENDIX-Fiscal_Scan-Focus_Group.pdf
   
 

 

Work Groups Members
   

Prenatal, Infant, Toddler
Community of Practice

Chairperson: Pauline Fortier

Mission: To Help parents and providers raise safe healthy and productive children by providing services, support and trainings

 

 

Pauline Fortier - Academy of Art and Learning
Allison Altieri-Vernon School Readiness Council - Project Coordinator  AAltieri@vernon-ct.gov
Chris P Petrone - ECHN
Jill Morey - ECHN
Latrice Grumley - ECHN
Kathy Minicucci - WIC
Andrea Cooper - CHR
Antonia Kapolis - parent
Michelle Hill - KIDSAFE
Marcia Ambrose - YMCA
Heather Michaud - YMCA
Simone Sewell - YMCA
   

Birth-8
Vernon School Readiness Council

Chairperson: Alan Slobodien/Lois Possell

Mission: To ensure that every child in Vernon starts school “ready to learn”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alan Slobodien - Youth Services
Lois Possell - Early Childhood Director, VPS
Andrea Cooper - CHR
Amanda Johnston - ECHN
Allison Altieri - Vernon School Readiness Council - Project Coordinator
Bruce Blair - HVCCC
Chris P Petrone - ECHN
Christine McFatter - Social Services
Jen Snyder - Vernon Preschool Collaborative
Jennifer Serra - Appletree
Jill Morey - ECHN
John Reilly - YMCA
Kathy Minicucci - WIC
Kelly Zimmerman - JUMPSTART
Latrice Grumley - ECHN
Lisa Perry - Parent
Lori Osgood - Child Academy
Marcia Ambrose - YMCA
Mary Conway - Superintendent, VPS
Michelle Hill - KIDSAFECT
Pat Goff - RHS
Pauline Fortier - Academy of Art and Learning
Sandye Simon - Principal, Skinner Rd School
Shahla Zarinejad - Rockville Public Library
Steven Peterson - Vernon Town Council
Svetlana Grishtaev - Vernon Adult Ed
Tess Mackenzie - ECHN Family Resource Center
Tina Gladden - YMCA

 

   

Preschool
Community of Practice

Chairperson: Bruce Blair 

Mission: TBD

 

 

Bruce Blair - HVCCC
Andrea Cooper - CHR
Jennifer Serra - Apple tree
Marcia Ambrose - YMCA
Michelle Hill - KIDSAFECT
Jayne Reichle - YMCA
Renee Vinton - Academy of Art and Learning
Stacy Lagasse - Maple St School
Deanna Murray - Skinner Rd School
Lori Osgood - Child Academy
Tess Mackenzie - ECHN Family Resource Center
Cindy Eastman - Grove St.
Anne Gaston - Grove St.
   

Strategic Communications

Chairperson: Michelle Hill 

Mission: (TBD)

 

Michelle Hill- KIDSAFECT
Bruce Blair - HVCCC
Allison Altieri - Vernon School Readiness project coordinator

 

 

   

Youth Committee  
(Ages
9-18)

Chairperson: Michelle Hill 

Mission: (TBD)

 

 

 

 

Michelle Hill - KIDSAFE
Alan Slobodien - Youth Services
Alysse Hoagland - RHS
Barbara Paschal Gladstone - ECHN
David O’Rourke - HVCC
Dawn Jackle - DCF
Diane Madore - RHS
Jaya Vijayasekar - Vernon Public Schools
Jill Charbonneau - DCF
Judie Culy - United Methodist Church
Kimberly Marinan - RHS
Kimberly Mctighe - Youth Services
Maureen Flanagan - Court Support Services Division
Melissa Aducci - RHS
Paula Plante - KIDSAFECT
William Bilyak - Vernon Public Schools
   

Summer Learning
Work Group

Chairperson: Michelle Hill 

Mission: (TBD)

 

 

 

Michelle Hill - KIDSAFECT
Alan Slobodien - Youth Services
Amy Locandro - Vernon Park and Rec
Allison Altieri - VSR Project coordinator
Justin Gussy - Vernon Public Schools
Kim Doughtie - Park West
Letesha  Nelson - Girl Scouts of Connecticut
Marcia Ambrose - YMCA
Michael Debellis - Vernon Public Schools
Pauline Fortier - Academy of Art and Learning
Shahla Zarinejad - Rockville Public Library
Sharon Redfern - Rockville Public Library

 

   

Vernon Hunger Action Team 
(H.A.T.)
 

Chairperson: Beatrice Maslowski

Mission: The Vernon HAT brings together local government, schools, faith groups, businesses, nonprofit service providers and concerned residents to eliminate the problem of hunger in our community. 

We collaborate to maximize available resources and work to identify any gaps in service. Our goal is to provide workable solutions to ensure that no Vernon resident goes hungry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beatrice Maslowski - Foodshare
Al Bauer - Cornerstone Foundation Soup Kitchen
Alison Smith - Foodshare
Ann Scharin - VSRC Project Manager
Beverly Fernandez - Rockville Church of the Nazarene
Bryan Flint - Cornerstone Foundation Shelter
Dawn Crayco - End Hunger CT
Diane Wheelock - Town of Vernon Mayor’s Office
Donna Camerota - 
Faith Provencher - HVCC
George Apel - Town of Vernon Mayor
Helen Syriac - Cornerstone Foundation
Joan Cadieux - HVCC
Joan Robinson - Foodshare
Judie Culy - Rockville United Methodist Church
Kathy Minicucci - WIC
Kim Barletto - 
Larry Meehan - Bev’s Corner/Union Church
Marina Rodriguez - Town of Vernon
Social Services Director 
Maryann Fusco-Rollins - 4-H
Michelle Hill - KIDSAFECT
Mike Purcaro - Town of Vernon/BOE
Patricia Skoog - Forensic Health Services
Patricia Buell - Vernon Public Schools
Sam Stovall - HVCC
Sarah Santora - Foodshare
Alan Slobodien - Town of Vernon VYSB
Tess Mackenzie - ECHN/FRC
   

 

Work Groups for Implementation
Task Force Web page (Coming Soon) Contact Info for Plan

Zero to 8 Years Old

Infants & Toddlers

 

Zero - 8 years - Work Group
Vernon School Readiness Council

Michelle Hill

Pauline Fortier

 


9 to 18 Years Old
9-18 years - Work Group Vernon Youth Service Bureau

Michelle Hill

Alan Slobodien


Community
Community Work Group
Rockville Community Alliance

Vernon Hunger Action Team

Alan Slobodien

     
     

Data Sources

http://www.ctreports.com/ 

http://sdeportal.ct.gov/Cedar/WEB/ResearchandReports/AnnualPerformanceReport.aspx 

http://solutions1.emetric.net/cmtpublic/CMTCode/Report.aspx 

 

 


State by District/School Report
Grade 3

Total Mathematics 

Total Reading

Total Writing

Group

Year

Number
Tested

Average
Scale
Score

% At/Above 
Goal

% At/Above
Proficiency

Number
Tested

Average
Scale
Score

% At/Above
Goal

% At/Above
Proficiency

Number
Tested

Average
Scale
Score

% At/Above
 Goal

% At/Above
Proficiency

State

2006

41558

248.9

56.3

78.3

41460

235.7

54.4

69.2

40882

251.2

61.1

81.7

2007

41756

252.2

59.4

80.1

41652

235.9

52.3

69.3

41364

252.2

60.8

82.4

2008

41226

252.7

60.2

80.7

41133

236

52.1

68.4

40917

253.3

63.5

82.9

2009

40005

256.7

63

82.8

39639

239.2

54.6

71.1

40852

254.3

62.6

83.2

2010

39439

258.6

62.6

83.6

39005

240.2

57.1

72.3

40134

250.7

58.3

80.3

2011

38316

259.3

63.2

84.3

37904

241.2

58.3

73.9

39127

252.5

61.1

81.1

2012

39029

262.9

66.8

85.8

38592

245.2

59.2

74.5

40013

254.2

62.7

83.2

Vernon

2006

271

249.9

59.8

85.6

271

245

63.1

79

266

246

57.5

82.3

2007

244

256

63.1

82.8

243

243.7

62.1

77.4

244

258.7

70.9

84.8

2008

294

247.6

57.5

78.9

294

231.4

48

67.7

292

247.5

61.6

80.8

2009

279

247.9

54.5

79.9

277

228.3

37.5

61

277

245.8

50.9

82.7

2010

259

251.7

59.8

79.9

258

231.1

46.5

64.7

260

244.4

52.7

75

2011

245

252.2

56.7

83.3

244

237.9

54.9

71.7

249

247.7

62.7

77.9

2012

246

259.2

64.2

85.4

244

241.2

59

73.4

247

251.4

59.1

84.6

 


 • Prenatal Care

• Babies Born at Low Birth Weight

 • Child Abuse and Neglect

• Risk Factors Associated with Child Abuse & Neglect

Children Living with Single Parent

Children Living below Poverty Level

 • Preschool Experience

 • 3rd Grade CMT Reading

• 3rd Grade Reading CMT Scores by School

 Page 9



• Prenatal Care

• Babies Born at Low Birth Weight

   C. WHAT CAN WE DO?

 In order to have a positive effect on the rate of non-adequate prenatal care and corresponding low birth weight of babies, it is important to reach these women pre-pregnancy or in their first trimester. This will take an effort by the Vernon community that builds on existing programs and services while introducing innovative approaches.

 1. Additional data collection and analysis on non-adequate prenatal care and low birth weight as they relate to race and ethnicity, age of mother, and mother’s level of education.

 2. Explore opportunities for expanding home visitation services in Vernon.

a) Research Child First (Bridgeport) to assess opportunity for replication locally.

b) Assess the possibility of expanding Nurturing Families outreach efforts.

 3. Create a multi-pronged approach to raising awareness on the importance of adequate prenatal care.

a) Meet with Rockville High School Health teachers to discuss curriculum expansion.

b) Connect with local pharmacies for planned display of informational materials.

c) Expand scope and eligibility for community baby showers to include all income levels.

d) Enhance use of existing media such as organizational websites and community newspapers.

e) Identify and train peer/adult mentors to serve as neighborhood resources.

f) Include prenatal care booths and vendors in Vernon Holistic Fair.

 DATA DEVELOPMENT AGENDA (DDA) – Childhood Obesity

Healthcare practitioners define obesity in different ways. The U.S. Surgeon General, Dr. Regina Benjamin recently stated that the most common thing that physicians and other clinicians use is the BMI (Body Mass Index), the relationship between height and weight. She noted, however, that someone could have a BMI that is outside of the range and still be perfectly healthy. Given this discrepancy, most people are starting to move to the percentage of body fat as a much better indicator, according to Dr. Benjamin. Ways in which to do this comprehensively are being explored. Further, some family physicians who see the entire family, women and children, have raised a concern about the lack of specific guidelines that would help them in their working with childhood obesity.

 In order to combat chronic disease, the Connecticut Department of Public Health is in the process of creating  “Connecticut’s Plan for Heart Healthy, Smoke Free, & Physically Fit Communities 2011-2016”. This plan offers insight in the chronic health issue of childhood obesity. The Vernon Public School Wellness Committee will serve as the link to this statewide planning process and its local implementation.

 D. HOW WILL WE KNOW WE MADE A DIFFERENCE?

• How much did we do?
• How well did we do it?

• Is anyone better off?

Page 13


• Child Abuse and Neglect

• Risk Factors Associated with Child Abuse & Neglect

Children Living with Single Parent

Children Living below Poverty Level

 C. WHAT CAN WE DO?

 The Vernon Community Network and Vernon School Readiness Council agree that a coordinated approach involving local, regional and state partnerships is most effective in addressing issues of abuse and neglect.

The following proposed strategies implemented locally, will make a difference for children Birth to 8 who are suffering and/or at risk of abuse and neglect.

 1. Develop a coordinated system of response for identified families.

a) Establish a Child Advocacy Team (CAT), to create a collaborative approach to aid and assist families with complex service needs.

• Assess opportunity to redeploy existing resources

• Seek new funding

b) Capture historical (situational) responses of Vernon Community Network to date to map future responses.

c) Reduce barriers to participation in existing parent education programs.

d) Implement mentoring programs, based on the Parent-Aide model, a system for long-term commitment to families who exhibit the risk factors connected with child abuse and neglect.

e) Expand Nurturing Families Network screening and services in order to identify all families who present

with risk factors for abuse and neglect and connect them with services.

 2. Increase the capacity of the Vernon Community Network and its members to better meet the needs of children and families.

a) Conduct Asset Mapping of Vernon Community Network – individual, group and community members

• Host a Vernon Community Network Agency Fair – increasing awareness of existing services and resources

• Make targeted linkages by connecting community needs to the appropriate VCN provider or organization.

b) Create a coordinated calendar of training and technical assistance opportunities throughout the community.

• Program Performance and Accountability

 D. HOW WILL WE KNOW WE MADE A DIFFERENCE?

 How much did we do?

# of community volunteers who register for mentor training.
# of VCN members who attend capacity-building sessions.

 • How well did we do it?

% of volunteers who attend all mentor training sessions.
% of VCN members who attend capacity-building sessions.
% of VCN members who participate in the development of a coordinated system.

 • Is anyone better off?

% of trained volunteers that have increased ability to mentor others.
% of VCN members who report using acquired capacity-building skills in their work environment.
% of VCN members who adopt a common screening tool.

Page 18



• Preschool Experience

 C. WHAT CAN WE DO?

 In order to move the high quality early childhood agenda forward, two critical issues must be addressed. First, those involved must come to an agreement about what defines a program as being high quality, and secondly, how do we work collaboratively to help each program meet this definition. Can we identify and create pathways and resources to help programs meet these standards?

 At the present time, the following two systems are recognized nationally as being indicative of meeting the definition of high quality: 1) Accreditation by the National Association for the Education of Young Children, and 2) Head Start Performance Standards. It is intended that the Vernon School Readiness Council’s Vernon Early Childhood Community of Practice, in addition to implementing these national systems, take the following actions:

 1. Develop community based-quality standards (e.g. Vernon Early Childhood Quality Indicators) that all preschool programs could work towards.

a) Expand VECCoP Membership to include all preschool providers in Vernon.

b) Examine existing quality standards.

c) Assess current standards and practices at the centers in Vernon.

d) Adopt quality indicators.

e) Share with the community to raise awareness of quality standards.

 2. Provide coaching and other supports to programs while they work to attain and maintain these standards.

a) Create Coaching job descriptions, qualifications.

b) Establish volunteer participation guidelines for providers.

c) Create a benefit program and assessment procedure for centers needing access to financial support.

d) Create Resource binders for participating programs/centers

 D. HOW WILL WE KNOW WE MADE A DIFFERENCE?

 How much did we do?

# of preschool programs that participate in the development of agreed upon quality standards for Vernon.
# of preschool programs that implement the standards.

How well did we do it?

% of preschool programs that increase quality standards based on coaching and other supports provided.

Is anyone better off?

% of preschool programs that meet high quality criteria of as defined by the Vernon Early Childhood Quality Indicators.
% of kindergarteners who attend a quality preschool as defined by Vernon Early Childhood Quality Standards.

Page 23


 

• 3rd Grade CMT Reading

• 3rd Grade Reading CMT Scores by School

 C. WHAT CAN WE DO?

 Children entering kindergarten in the Vernon Public Schools bring a variety of background and preparation with them. There is a wide disparity in the socio-economic status of the families in Vernon (an average poverty rate of 46% in our elementary schools) and that appears to influence the experiences each child has prior to entering school. In addition to a wide range of vocabulary acquisition, there is a wide range of contextual experiences for each child. While we live near farmland, many of our children have never seen a cow. We are relatively near the ocean and some of our children do not have the experience of a day at the beach. Some children do not have home libraries or visit our public library with regularity. In addition, the preschool experiences that our children have are varied in quality.

 1. Provide opportunities for preschool children to be exposed to and interact with text and to contextually increase their vocabulary acquisition and background knowledge

 

a) Ensure that every child has access to a high quality preschool experience.

b) Ensure that all children have access to text – put books into the hands and homes of children.

c) Provide varied opportunities for children to engage in experiences which expand their background knowledge and vocabulary.

 2. Provide a guaranteed viable curriculum, delivered through high quality instruction and ensured through a variety of assessments, to which every student has access and multiple opportunities to achieve.

 

a) Develop and Implement a reading and language arts curriculum based on national and state standards.

b) Provide opportunities for teachers to develop and expand their instructional practices.

c) Differentiate instruction for each learner to ensure that every student has access to the curriculum.

d) Develop and implement common assessments that measure student achievement of the curriculum and report the results.

 D. HOW WILL WE KNOW WE MADE A DIFFERENCE?

 How much did we do?

# of varied preschool offerings that ensures access to high quality preschool for every child.

# of preschool providers that regularly reviews and implements pre-literacy skills.

# of books in the hands of every child at regular intervals from birth to age 5.

# of varied opportunities for young children to expand their world and build their vocabulary and background knowledge.

# of complete reading curriculum in the hands of every teacher.

# of common assessments.

How well did we do it?

% of books delivered to children birth to five that are read.

% of preschool children with varied opportunities for outside learning.

% of local reading/language arts curriculum implemented with fidelity.

% of kindergarten students at low risk in letter naming fluency, letter sound fluency, and phoneme segmentation on fall universal screening assessments.

% of kindergarten students reading at least at the state goal (Level 4 = Level C in Vernon) at the end of kindergarten.

% of students reading at/above goal at each grade level.

Is anyone better off?

% of children who are assessed ready to learn at kindergarten entry.

85%-90% of all children will read at least the state goal at the end of kindergarten.

100% of children will read on grade level by the end of grade 3.

Page 27


 

• Juvenile Risk - FWSN & Youthful Offenders

 

• School Attendance

• High School Graduation

Page 29


 

• Juvenile Risk - FWSN & Youthful Offenders

 C. WHAT CAN WE DO?

 The Leadership Workgroup and content area experts agree that a coordinated community response to prevention and early intervention is tantamount to success in reducing the number of Vernon youth involved in status offending and delinquent behaviors. It is imperative that parents, service organizations, educators and communities come together when tackling the issue of juveniles at risk. The following strategies outline an approach that will be effective in producing positive outcomes for Vernon youth, helping them to grow up healthy, caring, productive, and connected to their community.

 Research and best practice tell us that using a strength-based approach to develop the assets of children and youth in order to produce behaviors that are more positive, lead to success – in their school, family and community. Specifically, the Search Institute has designed and broadly field-tested the 40 Developmental Assets. This is a framework for positive youth development, grounded in extensive research, resiliency, and prevention. In addition to implementing the strategies outlined in the Child Abuse and Neglect section of this plan (pg 18), we propose the following to target status offending and delinquent juveniles as well as those adults who help them.

 1. Design a positive youth development system focused on preventing criminal and unsafe behaviors.

a) Continue to strengthen the capacity of the Juvenile Review Board.

b) Conduct adult volunteer recruitment and training around mentoring and peer-support for youth and families.

c) Create neighborhood-based safe places with adult supervision, with a centralized location – for accessibility.

d) Maintain and expand the summer youth employment program of the Vernon Youth Services Bureau.

e) Create Youth Emergency Services or similar community-based respite programs.
f) Expand hours of the Vernon Public Schools Expulsion Center.

 

2. Encourage child and youth-serving organizations to promote Developmental Assets (The Search Institute.)

a) Provide professional development opportunities on the Developmental Assets for those who work with Vernon youth.

b) Provide parents, civic and faith organizations, and other caring adults training in the Developmental Assets.

D. HOW WILL WE KNOW WE MADE A DIFFERENCE?

How much did we do?

# of parents/professionals who register for Developmental Assets training sessions.

How well did we do it?

% of parents/professionals satisfied with Developmental Assets training sessions.

Is anyone better off?

% of those trained who incorporate Asset development in their work.

% of parents/professionals reporting a decrease in high-risk behaviors of youth they work with.

Page 33


• School Attendance

• High School Graduation

 C. WHAT CAN WE DO?

 Education is critical to future success, which requires schools, families and communities to be working in tandem.

  In fact, we know that students with involved parents (regardless of family income or background) are more likely to: Attend school regularly, adapt well to school, earn higher grades and test scores, have better social skills and behavior, and graduate and go on to postsecondary education.

 Successful partnerships are needed in order to address the core issues surrounding poor school attendance and high school dropouts as described in this plan. These core issues include: the ebb and flow of parent involvement throughout a child’s education, disenfranchised and disconnected youth, and disparities that exist from school to school, including professional development and family dynamics. If these root causes are addressed, then parents, schools and the community should witness an overall improvement in school attendance and graduation rates.

1. Expand School-Family-Community Partnership Project into all of the elementary schools, Vernon Center Middle School and Rockville High School.

2. Implement the Attendance, Achievement, Attainment framework targeting parents engaged as partners.

a) Create an action plan that specifies steps to fully implement the 3 A’s.

b) Expand the capacity of the Youth Services Bureau (YSB) Counselors in the Vernon school system.

c) Explore reinstituting Teen-Parent Program at Rockville High School.

3. Encourage child and youth-serving organizations to promote Developmental Assets (The Search Institute).

a) Provide professional development opportunities on the Developmental Assets for those who work with Vernon youth. 

b) Provide parents, civic and faith organizations, and other caring adults training in the Developmental Assets.

Data Development Agenda (DDA):

 Recognize Social Capital and connect youth to community.

Develop and conduct a survey of youth on community connectedness relative to social capital to establish a baseline.

 D. HOW WILL WE KNOW WE MADE A DIFFERENCE?

• How much did we do?

• How well did we do it?

• Is anyone better off?

 

Page 41


 

 

• Poverty

 

• Community Input

• Focus Groups and Interviews

Questions & Results

 

Page 43


• Poverty

C. WHAT CAN WE DO?

 While we will not be able to completely eliminate poverty in our community, we can work towards reducing the impacts of poverty on children and families in Vernon.

1. Develop a coordinated system of need based identification and service delivery designed to reduce the impact of poverty.

a) Determine existing points of intake (e.g. local agencies, schools, hospitals, faith communities, etc.) and inventory existing intake procedures and forms.

b) Inventory available physical facilities in town and those accessible from the Town of Vernon that may serve as a “one-stop” location for service needs and delivery.

c) Research Geographical Information System (GIS) for creation of a virtual “one-stop” location to be available at each partner organization.

d) Create a uniform intake procedure and corresponding documentation.

e) Utilize multi-media venues such as email, internet, and local cable access.

f) Track cases and follow up.

2. Develop a comprehensive mentoring system to provide enhanced case management and social connectedness for children and families.

a) Inventory existing children’s mentoring programs.

b) Identify gaps in mentoring programs and create new resources.

DATA DEVELOPMENT AGENDA

Social Capital

L. J. Hanifan’s 1916 article regarding local support for rural schools is one of the first occurrences of the term “social capital” in reference to social cohesion and personal investment in the community. In defining the concept, Hanifan contrasts social capital with material goods by defining it as: “I do not refer to real estate, or to personal property or to cold cash, but rather to that in life which tends to make these tangible substances count for most in the daily lives of people, namely, goodwill, fellowship, mutual sympathy and social intercourse among a group of individuals and families who make up a social unit… If he may come into contact with his neighbor, and they with other neighbors, there will be an accumulation of social capital, which may immediately satisfy his social needs and which may bear a social potentiality sufficient to the substantial improvement of living conditions in the whole community. The community as a whole will benefit by the cooperation of all its parts, while the individual will find in his associations the advantages of the help, the sympathy, and the fellowship of his neighbors (pp. 130-131).”

The LWG is concerned about the lack of connection that both youth and adults expressed verbally and behaviorally in town and particularly in the schools. LWG believes that this is one resultant factor of living in poverty. Since this data does not yet exist for Vernon, a baseline will be developed by conducting a town-wide random sampling survey in 2011.

D. HOW WILL WE KNOW WE MADE A DIFFERENCE?

• How much did we do?

• How well did we do it?

• Is anyone better off?

 

Page 49


• Community Input

• Focus Groups and Interviews

Questions & Results

 

 

Page 50

 


FOCUS GROUP RESULTS

At the June 19, 2009 Leadership Work Group (LWG) meeting the members broke into small groups based on the Strategic Area of Focus (Safe, Healthy, and Productive) and were joined by content area experts to round out these teams. The work of the meeting was to analyze the report of compiled responses gathered from the focus groups and interviews conducted over the past several months.

The committees were asked to review the raw data, discuss and share reactions, and identify the top three or more themes that emerged from this analysis.

The results are as follows:

A. Focus Group

Parent Involvement themes:

• Adult supervision

• Listening to parents

• Parents as teachers

• Child proof homes

• Parenting skill development (RECURRING THEME)

• Parent education (also around employability skill development)

• Responsible parenting (use of internet/media)

• Role of parent (not friend)

• Literacy

Individual Responsibility:

• Being street smart

• Using common sense

• Listening to parents

• Goal-setting

• Good friends

• Friends with boundaries

Environment (outside home):

• Drug free communities

• Policy around walking to school needs to be revisited

• Safe play areas

• Safety in crossing streets/well lit streets

• Traffic control

• Stranger danger

• Gangs

• Police presence

• Neighborhood support (parent to parent)

• More meaningful, community building activities for residents

• Individual and family mentoring

• Peer advocates

• Better use of resources and coordination of services for persons in need

• Preventive health care, including behavioral

• All-day Kindergarten

• Employment and career opportunities

• Literacy

 

Page 50


 

B. Interview/Key Stakeholders:

 

• Parent education (RECURRING THEME)

• Teen pregnancy prevention

• Sufficient programs in communities (positive youth development and recreation)

 

At the April 17, 2009 Vernon Community Network meeting, the top 3 issues that were agreed upon by consensus as most challenging/lacking for the Vernon community and providers were:

 

1) Coordinated system of communication: both external (local 2-1-1) and inter-agency

2) Coordinated system of administrative functions: Funding, Marketing, Volunteers, Facilities

3) Enhanced service delivery system: parent engagement, family support

 

 

Page 51


• Strategies & Partners

• Performance Measures

• Finance

• Governance

Page 52


STRATEGIES & PARTNERS

There is no one entity or individual that can successfully and meaningfully implement all of the proposed strategies and actions described in this Plan. The following Strategy & Partner Matrixes were created in order to provide an at-a-glance of probable and potential partners, displayed by Indicator and Plan Section (Children, Youth, Community). Not every partner will be active in every strategy and action, and some partners may move in and out of the process based on relevance to the work of implementation and accountability as defined by various performance measures. In many cases Memorandums of Understanding (MOU’s) will be developed so that all partners are clear on who is responsible for what, the resources that can be brought/ redeployed, and assurances to create and account for performance measures of success.

 PERFORMANCE MEASURES

 This Plan is a baseline from which to begin to take action. This action must be measurable in both quantitative and qualitative ways. Individual programs will have measures, and some measures will be congruent with multiple partners, as well as across-systems. To this end the development of performance measures will be integral to holding partners and the community accountable for improving the outcomes for Vernon children and youth. Three main guiding questions will be used: “How much did we do?” “How well did we do it?” and most importantly, “Is anyone better off?” While some sections of this Plan already have suggested measures, others are in need of development. It is critical that all impacted partners be involved in the creation of such measures as they will be sharing in the accountability for the attainment of those measures and the on-going refinement of strategies and actions as they relate to making an impact on various indicators of child well-being as defined by on-going data collection.

  Page 53


Children Committee, Youth Committee and Community Committee

VCN Community Plan

Implementation

DEFINITION: Under direction of the Vernon Community Network (VCN) Executive Committee: leads and directs the following multi-disciplinary teams: Children Committee, Youth Committee and Community Committee connected to the VCN Community Plan.  

EXAMPLES OF DUTIES:

  1. Directs and manages VCN Committees in developing major projects by developing time lines and identifying necessary resources (human, fiscal, facility, equipment). 
  2. Coordinates community work groups to facilitate major projects. 
  3. Documents project progress and reports work accomplished to the VCN Executive Committee
  4. Advises VCN  Executive Committee as to project status, barriers and proposes solutions 
  5. Monitors project as to deadlines, resource needs and allocation. 

SUPERVISION: Receives general supervision and oral direction from Vernon Youth Services Director.  Reports work accomplished to Director

Project management; principles and practices of  public administration; research, analytical, and data collection techniques; principles and practices of management, supervision, and training. 

Manage project activities and the activities of multi-disciplinary teams, establish, balance, and adjust priorities; establish and maintain effective working relationships; promote a customer oriented approach towards meeting the needs of the Committees; prepare and present clear and concise oral and written communications; prepare a variety of narrative documents including policy statements, management reports, and correspondence; speak effectively before small and large groups; establish standards and evaluate performance in conjunction of the VCN Executive Committee; resolve operational and procedural problems and conflicts; respond effectively to a variety of changing situations.

 

 

 

 

 

 


RBA Terms


Rev. 1 (12/31/11)

http://www.ct.gov/dcf/lib/dcf/rba/pdf/ct_rba_glossary_rev__1_(12_31_11).pdf 


Glossary of RBA Terms Used in Connecticut*
Connecticut Appropriations Committee
The Language of Accountability


The most common problem in Results-Based Accountability or any similar work is the problem of language. People come to the table from many different disciplines and many different walks of life. And the way in which we talk about programs, services and populations varies all over the map. This means that the usual state of affairs in planning for children, families, adults, elders and communities is a Tower of Babel, where no one really knows what the other person is saying, but everyone politely pretends that they do. As a consequence, the work is slow, frustrating and often ineffective.


It is possible to exercise language discipline. And the way to do this is to agree on a set of definitions that start with ideas and not words. Words are just labels for ideas. And the same idea can have many different labels. The following nine ideas are central to RBA. The labels for these ideas are those chosen by the Appropriations Committee in Connecticut to ensure that everyone means the same thing when they use these ideas. They are the same terms that Mark Friedman uses in all of his material.


Results are conditions of well-being for entire populations -- children, adults, families or communities -- stated in plain English, or any other language. They are things that voters and taxpayers can understand. They are not about programs or agencies or government jargon. Results include: healthy children, children ready for school, children succeeding in school, children staying out of trouble, strong families, elders living with dignity in settings they prefer, safe communities, a healthy, clean environment, a prosperous economy. In Connecticut, we refer to population results, or quality of life results.


Indicators are measures that help quantify the achievement of a population result. They answer the question "How would we recognize these results in measurable terms if we fell over them?" So, for example, the rate of low-birth weight babies helps quantify whether we're getting healthy births. Third grade reading scores help quantify whether children are succeeding in school today and whether they were ready for school three years ago. The crime rate helps quantify whether we are living in safe communities. Indicators refer only to whole populations, not programs.


*Adopted from Mark Friedman’s Results Accountability Implementation Guide,  http://www.raguide.org/RA/the_language_of_accountability.htm


Strategies are coherent collections of actions which have a reasoned chance of improving results. Strategies are made up of our best thinking about what works, and they include the contributions of many partners. No single action by any one agency can create the improved results we want and need. Programs are not themselves strategies; they are expressions of strategies. Programs are specific ways of implementing strategies, usually targeted toward a specific sub-group within the population. For example, a strategy of family support may have as one expression the program Nurturing Families Network, which is targeted at new parents at risk of abusing or neglecting their newborn child.


Performance Measures are measures of how well public and private programs and agencies are working. The most important performance measures tell us whether the clients or customers of the program’s service are better off. Measures that track the quality of the program are also important. In Connecticut, we refer to measures of whether clients are better off as client or customer outcomes (to distinguish them from population results for all children, adults or families). Performance measure can apply to individual programs, entire agencies, or service delivery systems.


Baselines are what we call a trend line of an indicator or program measure when presented in a chart. The baseline consists of the history of the measure (what the measure has been for the last 3-5 years) and the forecast of where the measure will be in 3-5 years if we keep doing what we are doing.
Story Behind the Baseline is the diagnostic phase of RBA. It identifies the causes and forces at work behind the current level of performance for an indicator. Without a clear understanding of what is causing the performance to be the way it is, any strategies or actions are likely to be just random good ideas.
Turning the Curve describes efforts to improve the direction or rate of change in the baseline of an indicator or performance measure. It is also shorthand for the process of determining whether the current and projected level on an indicator or performance measure is acceptable or requires change. We turn the curve with strategies and actions that are based on What Works: what we know from the research, best practices, and our own experience is likely to address the story behind the baselines.


Ends and Means are an important distinction in RBA. Results and indicators are about the ends we want for children and families. Strategies, programs, and performance measures are about the means to get there. Processes that fail to make this crucial distinction often mix up ends and means. Ends are usually something everyone can agree on, e.g., people with better health, more education, safer streets. This agreement forms a common ground that allows the discussions to focus on the means, about which there are often legitimate differences of opinion that can be explored. Failed processes tend to get mired in a mixed discussion about ends and means that causes hopeless confusion and disillusionment. Clarity and discipline about language at the start will help you take your work from talk to action.

What about Mission and Vision, Values, Benchmarks, Goals, Objectives, Problems, Issues, Inputs and Outputs? Many of us have grown up with these traditional words in strategic planning and budgeting. Where do they fit? Remember that words are just labels for ideas. These ten words have no natural standard definitions that bridge across all the different ways they are used. They are terms of art which can and are used to label many different ideas. This is why we pay so much attention to getting language discipline straight at the very beginning. It's the ideas that are important, not the words. To avoid confusion, Connecticut does not use these words in its RBA work. For more information on how these words can be used in other contexts, see Mark Friedman’s discussion of The Language of Accountability at


   www.raguide.org/RA/the_language_of_accountability.htm 

 

 

 
   

Vernon Community Plan Progress

P
A
G
E

INITIATIVE/TASK

ASSIGNED TO

STATUS

 

 

 

 

 

http://1vernon.org/Vernon_Comm_Plan/Vernon4.gif

• Prenatal Care

• Babies Born at Low Birth Weight

   C. WHAT CAN WE DO?

 In order to have a positive effect on the rate of non-adequate prenatal care and corresponding low birth weight of babies, it is important to reach these women pre-pregnancy or in their first trimester. This will take an effort by the Vernon community that builds on existing programs and services while introducing innovative approaches.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

1. Additional data collection and analysis on non-adequate prenatal care and low birth weight as they relate to race and ethnicity, age of mother, and mother’s level of education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

 2. Explore opportunities for expanding home visitation services in Vernon.

 

 

 

 

a) Research Child First (Bridgeport) to assess opportunity for replication locally.

 

 

 

 

b) Assess the possibility of expanding Nurturing Families outreach efforts

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

 3. Create a multi-pronged approach to raising awareness on the importance of adequate prenatal care.

 

 

 

 

a) Meet with Rockville High School Health teachers to discuss curriculum expansion.

 

 

 

 

b) Connect with local pharmacies for planned display of informational materials.

 

 

 

 

c) Expand scope and eligibility for community baby showers to include all income levels.

 

 

 

 

d) Enhance use of existing media such as organizational websites and community newspapers.

 

 

 

 

e) Identify and train peer/adult mentors to serve as neighborhood resources.

 

 

 

 

f) Include prenatal care booths and vendors in Vernon Holistic Fair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DATA DEVELOPMENT AGENDA (DDA) – Childhood Obesity

Healthcare practitioners define obesity in different ways. The U.S. Surgeon General, Dr. Regina Benjamin recently stated that the most common thing that physicians and other clinicians use is the BMI (Body Mass Index), the relationship between height and weight. She noted, however, that someone could have a BMI that is outside of the range and still be perfectly healthy. Given this discrepancy, most people are starting to move to the percentage of body fat as a much better indicator, according to Dr. Benjamin. Ways in which to do this comprehensively are being explored. Further, some family physicians who see the entire family, women and children, have raised a concern about the lack of specific guidelines that would help them in their working with childhood obesity.

 

 

 

 

In order to combat chronic disease, the Connecticut Department of Public Health is in the process of creating  “Connecticut’s Plan for Heart Healthy, Smoke Free, & Physically Fit Communities 2011-2016”. This plan offers insight in the chronic health issue of childhood obesity. The Vernon Public School Wellness Committee will serve as the link to this statewide planning process and its local implementation.

 

Vernon Public School Wellness Committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

• Child Abuse and Neglect

• Risk Factors Associated with Child Abuse & Neglect

Children Living with Single Parent

Children Living below Poverty Level

The Vernon Community Network and Vernon School Readiness Council agree that a coordinated approach involving local, regional and state partnerships is most effective in addressing issues of abuse and neglect.

The following proposed strategies implemented locally, will make a difference for children Birth to 8 who are suffering and/or at risk of abuse and neglect.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

 1. Develop a coordinated system of response for identified families.

 

 

 

 

a) Establish a Child Advocacy Team (CAT), to create a collaborative approach to aid and assist families with complex service needs.

 

 

 

 

• Assess opportunity to redeploy existing resources

 

 

 

• Seek new funding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

b) Capture historical (situational) responses of Vernon Community Network to date to map future responses.

 

 

 

 

c) Reduce barriers to participation in existing parent education programs.

 

 

 

d) Implement mentoring programs, based on the Parent-Aide model, a system for long-term commitment to families who exhibit the risk factors connected with child abuse and neglect.

 

 

 

 

e) Expand Nurturing Families Network screening and services in order to identify all families who present with risk factors for abuse and neglect and connect them with services.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Increase the capacity of the Vernon Community Network and its members to better meet the needs of children and families.

 

 

 

 

a) Conduct Asset Mapping of Vernon Community Network – individual, group and community members

 

 

 

 

• Host a Vernon Community Network Agency Fair – increasing awareness of existing services and resources

 

 

 

 

• Make targeted linkages by connecting community needs to the appropriate VCN provider or organization.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

b) Create a coordinated calendar of training and technical assistance opportunities throughout the community.

 

 

 

 

• Program Performance and Accountability

 

 

 

 

% of trained volunteers that have increased ability to mentor others.

 

 

 

 

% of VCN members who report using acquired capacity-building skills in their work environment.

 

 

 

 

% of VCN members who adopt a common screening tool.

 

 

 

 

 # of community volunteers who register for mentor training.

 

 

 

 

# of VCN members who attend capacity-building sessions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preschool Experience

At the present time, the following two systems are recognized nationally as being indicative of meeting the definition of high quality: 1) Accreditation by the National Association for the Education of Young Children, and 2) Head Start Performance Standards. It is intended that the Vernon School Readiness Council’s Vernon Early Childhood Community of Practice, in addition to implementing these national systems, take the following actions:

In order to move the high quality early childhood agenda forward, two critical issues must be addressed. First, those involved must come to an agreement about what defines a program as being high quality, and secondly, how do we work collaboratively to help each program meet this definition. Can we identify and create pathways and resources to help programs meet these standards?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23

1.     Develop community based-quality standards (e.g. Vernon Early Childhood Quality Indicators) that all preschool programs could work towards.

 

 

 

 

a) Expand VECCoP Membership to include all preschool providers in Vernon.

 

 

 

b) Examine existing quality standards.

 

 

 

c) Assess current standards and practices at the centers in Vernon.

 

 

 

d) Adopt quality indicators.

 

 

 

e) Share with the community to raise awareness of quality standards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23

2. Provide coaching and other supports to programs while they work to attain and maintain these standards.

 

 

 

 

a) Create Coaching job descriptions, qualifications.

 

 

 

 

b) Establish volunteer participation guidelines for providers.

 

 

 

 

c) Create a benefit program and assessment procedure for centers needing access to financial support.

 

 

 

 

d) Create Resource binders for participating programs/centers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 # of preschool programs that participate in the development of agreed upon quality standards for Vernon.

 

 

 

 

# of preschool programs that implement the standards.

 

 

 

% of preschool programs that increase quality standards based on coaching and other supports provided.

 

 

 

 

% of preschool programs that meet high quality criteria of as defined by the Vernon Early Childhood Quality Indicators.

 

 

 

 

% of kindergarteners who attend a quality preschool as defined by Vernon Early Childhood Quality Standards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

• 3rd Grade CMT Reading

 

• 3rd Grade Reading CMT Scores by School

 

Children entering kindergarten in the Vernon Public Schools bring a variety of background and preparation with them. There is a wide disparity in the socio-economic status of the families in Vernon (an average poverty rate of 46% in our elementary schools) and that appears to influence the experiences each child has prior to entering school. In addition to a wide range of vocabulary acquisition, there is a wide range of contextual experiences for each child. While we live near farmland, many of our children have never seen a cow. We are relatively near the ocean and some of our children do not have the experience of a day at the beach. Some children do not have home libraries or visit our public library with regularity. In addition, the preschool experiences that our children have are varied in quality.

 

 

 

27

1. Provide opportunities for preschool children to be exposed to and interact with text and to contextually increase their vocabulary acquisition and background knowledge

 

 

 

 

a) Ensure that every child has access to a high quality preschool experience.

 

 

 

 

b) Ensure that all children have access to text – put books into the hands and homes of children.

 

 

 

 

c) Provide varied opportunities for children to engage in experiences which expand their background knowledge and vocabulary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27

2. Provide a guaranteed viable curriculum, delivered through high quality instruction and ensured through a variety of assessments, to which every student has access and multiple opportunities to achieve.

 

 

 

 

a) Develop and Implement a reading and language arts curriculum based on national and state standards.

 

 

 

 

b) Provide opportunities for teachers to develop and expand their instructional practices.

 

 

 

 

c) Differentiate instruction for each learner to ensure that every student has access to the curriculum.

 

 

 

 

d) Develop and implement common assessments that measure student achievement of the curriculum and report the results.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How much did we do?

 

 

 

 

# of varied preschool offerings that ensures access to high quality preschool for every child.

 

 

 

 

# of preschool providers that regularly reviews and implements pre-literacy skills.

 

 

 

 

# of books in the hands of every child at regular intervals from birth to age 5.

 

 

 

 

# of varied opportunities for young children to expand their world and build their vocabulary and background knowledge.

 

 

 

 

# of complete reading curriculum in the hands of every teacher.

 

 

 

 

# of common assessments.

 

 

 

 

How well did we do it?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D. HOW WILL WE KNOW WE MADE A DIFFERENCE?

 

 

 

% of books delivered to children birth to five that are read.

 

 

 

 

% of preschool children with varied opportunities for outside learning.

 

 

 

 

% of local reading/language arts curriculum implemented with fidelity.

 

 

 

 

% of kindergarten students at low risk in letter naming fluency, letter sound fluency, and phoneme segmentation on fall universal screening assessments.

 

 

 

 

% of kindergarten students reading at least at the state goal (Level 4 = Level C in Vernon) at the end of kindergarten.

 

 

 

 

% of students reading at/above goal at each grade level.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is anyone better off?

 

 

 

 

% of children who are assessed ready to learn at kindergarten entry.

 

 

 

85%-90% of all children will read at least the state goal at the end of kindergarten.

 

 

 

100% of children will read on grade level by the end of grade 3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://1vernon.org/Vernon_Comm_Plan/Vernon5.gif

 

• Juvenile Risk - FWSN & Youthful Offenders

 

• School Attendance

• High School Graduation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The Leadership Workgroup and content area experts agree that a coordinated community response to prevention and early intervention is tantamount to success in reducing the number of Vernon youth involved in status offending and delinquent behaviors. It is imperative that parents, service organizations, educators and communities come together when tackling the issue of juveniles at risk. The following strategies outline an approach that will be effective in producing positive outcomes for Vernon youth, helping them to grow up healthy, caring, productive, and connected to their community.

 Research and best practice tell us that using a strength-based approach to develop the assets of children and youth in order to produce behaviors that are more positive, lead to success – in their school, family and community. Specifically, the Search Institute has designed and broadly field-tested the 40 Developmental Assets. This is a framework for positive youth development, grounded in extensive research, resiliency, and prevention. In addition to implementing the strategies outlined in the Child Abuse and Neglect section of this plan (pg 18), we propose the following to target status offending and delinquent juveniles as well as those adults who help them.

 

 

 

 

• Juvenile Risk - FWSN & Youthful Offenders

 

 

 

33

 1. Design a positive youth development system focused on preventing criminal and unsafe behaviors.

 

 

 

 

a) Continue to strengthen the capacity of the Juvenile Review Board.

 

 

 

b) Conduct adult volunteer recruitment and training around mentoring and peer-support for youth and families.

 

 

 

 

c) Create neighborhood-based safe places with adult supervision, with a centralized location – for accessibility.

 

 

 

 

d) Maintain and expand the summer youth employment program of the Vernon Youth Services Bureau.

 

 

 

 

e) Create Youth Emergency Services or similar community-based respite programs.

 

 

 

f) Expand hours of the Vernon Public Schools Expulsion Center.

 

 

 

 

 

 

33

2. Encourage child and youth-serving organizations to promote Developmental Assets (The Search Institute.)

 

 

 

 

a) Provide professional development opportunities on the Developmental Assets for those who work with Vernon youth.

 

 

 

 

b) Provide parents, civic and faith organizations, and other caring adults training in the Developmental Assets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How much did we do?

# of parents/professionals who register for Developmental Assets training sessions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How well did we do it?

% of parents/professionals satisfied with Developmental Assets training sessions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is anyone better off?

 

 

 

 

% of those trained who incorporate Asset development in their work.

 

 

 

 

% of parents/professionals reporting a decrease in high-risk behaviors of youth they work with.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

• School Attendance

• High School Graduation

 C. WHAT CAN WE DO?

 Education is critical to future success, which requires schools, families and communities to be working in tandem.

  In fact, we know that students with involved parents (regardless of family income or background) are more likely to: Attend school regularly, adapt well to school, earn higher grades and test scores, have better social skills and behavior, and graduate and go on to postsecondary education.

 Successful partnerships are needed in order to address the core issues surrounding poor school attendance and high school dropouts as described in this plan. These core issues include: the ebb and flow of parent involvement throughout a child’s education, disenfranchised and disconnected youth, and disparities that exist from school to school, including professional development and family dynamics. If these root causes are addressed, then parents, schools and the community should witness an overall improvement in school attendance and graduation rates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

41

1. Expand School-Family-Community Partnership Project into all of the elementary schools, Vernon Center Middle School and Rockville High School.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

41

2. Implement the Attendance, Achievement, Attainment framework targeting parents engaged as partners.

 

 

 

 

a) Create an action plan that specifies steps to fully implement the 3 A’s.

 

 

 

 

b) Expand the capacity of the Youth Services Bureau (YSB) Counselors in the Vernon school system.

 

 

 

 

c) Explore reinstituting Teen-Parent Program at Rockville High School.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

41

3. Encourage child and youth-serving organizations to promote Developmental Assets (The Search Institute).

 

 

 

 

a) Provide professional development opportunities on the Developmental Assets for those who work with Vernon youth. 

 

 

 

 

b) Provide parents, civic and faith organizations, and other caring adults training in the Developmental Assets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Data Development Agenda (DDA):

 Recognize Social Capital and connect youth to community.

Develop and conduct a survey of youth on community connectedness relative to social capital to establish a baseline.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://1vernon.org/Vernon_Comm_Plan/Vernon6.gif

• Poverty

 

• Community Input

• Focus Groups and Interviews

Questions & Results

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

• Poverty

C. WHAT CAN WE DO?

 

While we will not be able to completely eliminate poverty in our community, we can work towards reducing the impacts of poverty on children and families in Vernon.

 

 

 

49

1. Develop a coordinated system of need based identification and service delivery designed to reduce the impact of poverty.

 

 

 

 

a) Determine existing points of intake (e.g. local agencies, schools, hospitals, faith communities, etc.) and inventory existing intake procedures and forms.

 

 

 

 

b) Inventory available physical facilities in town and those accessible from the Town of Vernon that may serve as a “one-stop” location for service needs and delivery.

 

 

 

 

c) Research Geographical Information System (GIS) for creation of a virtual “one-stop” location to be available at each partner organization.

 

 

 

 

d) Create a uniform intake procedure and corresponding documentation.

 

 

 

 

e) Utilize multi-media venues such as email, internet, and local cable access.

 

 

 

 

f) Track cases and follow up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

49

2. Develop a comprehensive mentoring system to provide enhanced case management and social connectedness for children and families.

 

 

 

 

a) Inventory existing children’s mentoring programs.

 

 

 

 

b) Identify gaps in mentoring programs and create new resources.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DATA DEVELOPMENT AGENDA

Social Capital

L. J. Hanifan’s 1916 article regarding local support for rural schools is one of the first occurrences of the term “social capital” in reference to social cohesion and personal investment in the community. In defining the concept, Hanifan contrasts social capital with material goods by defining it as: “I do not refer to real estate, or to personal property or to cold cash, but rather to that in life which tends to make these tangible substances count for most in the daily lives of people, namely, goodwill, fellowship, mutual sympathy and social intercourse among a group of individuals and families who make up a social unit… If he may come into contact with his neighbor, and they with other neighbors, there will be an accumulation of social capital, which may immediately satisfy his social needs and which may bear a social potentiality sufficient to the substantial improvement of living conditions in the whole community. The community as a whole will benefit by the cooperation of all its parts, while the individual will find in his associations the advantages of the help, the sympathy, and the fellowship of his neighbors (pp. 130-131).”

The LWG is concerned about the lack of connection that both youth and adults expressed verbally and behaviorally in town and particularly in the schools. LWG believes that this is one resultant factor of living in poverty. Since this data does not yet exist for Vernon, a baseline will be developed by conducting a town-wide random sampling survey in 2011.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

Our goal: “All Vernon children birth to eighteen are safe, healthy and productive.”

 

 

 


The Vernon Community Network is a collaboration of providers that will identify and coordinate Social Service, 
Health, Educational and Economic Development resources for the enhancement of the community.

 

community service/volunteer opportunities as listed by Rockville High School

Click here for the contact information and membership of the Vernon Community Network

VCN-MEMBERSHIP_APPLICATION-2014-15.pdf  

Teri Rogers, VCN President   888/566-4161   tslingback@comcast.net

 Mailing address: Vernon Community Network     c/o KIDSAFE CT     19 Elm Street   Rockville, CT  06066



VCN Website hosting and maintenance sponsored by The Cornerstone Foundation, Inc.

Soup Kitchen | Homeless Shelter | Youth Center | Clothing Bank
"Cornerstone Cares!"