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VERNON COMMUNITY PLAN


Our goal: “All Vernon children birth to eighteen are safe, healthy and productive.”

VERNON
MULTI-DISCIPLINARY
TEAM
VERNON SCHOOL
READINESS
COUNCIL
 
   BEYOND FOOD DRIVES:
 
Ending Hunger Through Community Involvement

The Vernon Hunger Action Team (HAT) brings together local government, schools, faith groups, businesses, nonprofit service providers and concerned residents to eliminate the problem of hunger in our community. 

We collaborate to maximize available resources and work to identify any gaps in service. Our goal is to provide workable solutions to ensure that no Vernon resident goes hungry.
 

 

Rockville/ Vernon

Food Resources

 

Tri-Town Pantry

Cornerstone Soup Kitchen

Mobile Foodshare

 

 


State of the State: Hunger in CT

Rich State, Empty Plates

A Symposium on Hunger in Connecticut

December 5, 2013

 

End Hunger Connecticut!

Advocates, Educators, Innovators, Experts

Making Room at the Table

Our mission is to end hunger in Connecticut through legislative and administrative advocacy, outreach and public education.

As a statewide anti-hunger and food security organization, we work in partnership with food security organizations, legislators, coalitions and advocacy groups to increase access to federal nutrition programs in Connecticut.

We drive action and affect change!

 

click here for full PDF version

 

 

   

HVCC Tri-Town Food Pantry

29 Naek Road, Suite 5C

Administration & Pantry: (860) 872-7727 • Fax (860) 870-6644

Transportation: (860) 870-7940

Food Pantry Hours (Effective August 1, 2013)

Monday 9 -12 Tuesday 10-1 Wednesday 9-1 and 4-6:30 Thursday 9-1 Friday 9-12 Closed Saturday and Sunday

Information for our clients:

Food is distributed on a first come, first served basis and will be distributed as equitably as possible based on the items on hand and the size of the family.

 To be eligible to receive food from the Pantry, you must live in Vernon, Tolland, Ellington, Coventry or South Windsor and meet income requirements. To determine if you meet eligibility requirements, please call 860-872-9825 and ask to speak to a case manager. The case manager will set up an intake meeting with you to determine your eligibility.

Please bring the following items with you to your intake meeting: 

  •     Proof of address (utility bill, state-issued ID)
  •     Proof of income of all household members
  •     Social Security cards for all household members
  •     Photo ID

You may obtain food from the pantry once every 30 days. In addition, you may obtain limited, additional food support (e.g., produce, bread, pasta, soup, etc.) once a week in the other three weeks of the month. You must bring your own bags to the Pantry to carry out your food.

The Cornerstone Soup Kitchen

15 Prospect Street           860-871-1823

Lunch is Monday – Sunday at 11:30AM 

Dinner is Monday – Friday at 5:00PM

 

Mobile Foodshare

Foodshare delivers fresh produce every other week on Thursday

10:15 am to 10:45 am at the Cornerstone parking lot off of Cottage Street. (Winter location, St. Bernard Parking lot)

11:15 am to 11:45 am at Park West Apartments off Terrace Ave.

 Inglesia Fuente de Salvacion Misionera de Rockville

The pantry is open every other Wednesday 9:00AM – 1:00PM

 

Additional Information is Available at www.1vernon.org

 

 

 

        

Donate to your local agencies

 
Tri-Town Pantry   Cornerstone Soup Kitchen

 

www.HVCChelps.org    www.Cornerstone-Rockville.org 
 
Donation Information   Donation Information

           


   
 

 

 

 

Everyone knows the good feeling we receive when we help others. 
When you decide to help, wouldn't you like to know that your donation helps as much as possible?

What type of donations are most efficient?

What does $30 purchase for a family?
(Two pictures of food, one bought retail, one bought through Foodshare)

What time of the year are people most hungry?

Which day are they most hungry?
(365 days per year!)


What helps provide more food; Food Drive or Fund Drive?

Foodshare serves 300 different programs in Hartford and Tolland counties, including many pantries, community kitchens and other programs in our area. We distribute 16 tons of food each day by securing truckload sized donations directly from the food industry. To keep this huge volume of food flowing to our partner agencies we ask our donors to consider a fund drive, rather than a food drive. There are a few good reasons for this.


Food drives may raise awareness of hunger, but they can never be a solution. The largest drive would not collect enough food to distribute even one day’s worth of food to every program we serve. Also, the donor pays top dollar for the food at retail prices, where we can work directly with the food industry to turn a $30 donation into a month’s worth of food for a hungry person. When this is communicated to the public, donors understand and are more willing to see their dollars used in the wisest possible way.


It’s important to know that Foodshare is highly efficient. For every donation we receive, 95%directly supports our work to end hunger, with only 5% covering administrative and fundraising costs!


If a food drive still feels like the way you wish to go, we recommend partnering directly with an agency in your neighborhood and Foodshare can help you to locate one. Individual agencies benefit more from local food collection efforts, where a lot of transportation costs are avoided that way.


We offer ½ hour lunch time tours of our Bloomfield facility.
If you are interested, we welcome you to arrange a visit!


Sarah M Santora 
Community Involvement Coordinator 
Foodshare, Inc. 

click flyer above for larger version


 


Beyond Food Drives: 
Ending Hunger Through Community Involvement

Let's can the food drives

Op-Ed http://articles.latimes.com/2011/nov/18/opinion/la-oe-arnold-canned-food-20111118 

Giving canned food is far less efficient than donating money to charities that serve the hungry.

November 18, 2011|By John Arnold and Katherina M. Rosqueta

The holiday season is here. And in the spirit of the season, millions of people will donate food to food drives. Much of that food will be lovingly packed into boxes and baskets to be distributed to needy families. And just as in years past, such well-intentioned food donations will needlessly leave millions of people hungry. Here's why.

In the traditional food drive/standardized food box approach, donors are asked to go to the store and buy food or to donate food from their cupboards. It's then dropped into a collection barrel, or piled around a Christmas tree, or put on the altar of their churches, etc.

For every $10 spent that way, $10 worth of food goes into the charity food distribution system. But if the receiving charity food agency packs and gives out the food in standardized boxes, research has shown that as much as half of the food may not get used. This is not because the receiving family wasn't needy but because the food is either something they can't use or don't know how to use.

So that $10 gift may end up providing only $5 worth of actual hunger relief. What's more, because donations to food drives are nearly impossible to document for tax deductions, the donor bears the full cost of the $10 donation for what amounts to $5 worth of food used.

By contrast, suppose the donor gave money — not food — to a charity serving the hungry. Three things can happen. First, instead of going to the store to buy food, the charity takes the donated funds to its area's food ba. There, for every dollar a donor would have spent to buy cans of food, the charity could draw about $20 worth of food. That's because food banks serve as nonprofit, wholesale-like clearinghouses for the food industry's surplus food, charging only a nominal handling fee for food drawn by charity agencies. So a $10 donation ends up leveraging as much as $200 worth of food for the charity to distribute.

Second, instead of packing the food into standardized boxes, the charity can display it in a store-like fashion and permit needy families to choose what they like. That practice, called "client choice," eliminates the problem of needy families being given food they cannot use.

Finally, if donors claim a charitable-gifts tax deduction, the after-tax cost to them in giving $10 could drop to as low as $7.50. Thus, by promoting fund drives instead of food drives, community members can drop the cost of addressing their area's hunger problem 25% simply by taking maximum advantage of available tax benefits.

The bottom line is that for the same amount of money spent on buying cans for a food drive, donors can feed 20 times more families by providing cash, not cans.

But wait, some argue: Our community food drive engages church members or schoolchildren in a way that writing a check or giving cash simply doesn't. To which we'd argue: Now is the time to match traditions with impact by demonstrating something that need not be in short supply — creativity! Instead of a canned food drive, have members of your congregation wash out cans used in making a meal, put their donations in the cans and bring them up to the altar. Have schoolchildren volunteer to put the food their financial donations have bought onto the shelves of the local food pantry. Given the amount of food the same amount of money could provide, it might require the whole school to stock the charity's shelves.

In September, the U.S. Department of Agriculture released its annual report on household food security. What it shows is that 48.8 million Americans lived in food-insecure households in 2010 — households that struggle to feed all members.

In the true spirit of the season, if you really want to help such vulnerable families, go to your local food bank (or to http://www.feedingamerica.org to find one near you). Then take the money you would have used to buy cans for food drives and donate it to that local pantry. Fewer families will go hungry.

 

John Arnold is the former executive director of Feeding America West Michigan Food Bank, which has distributed 300 million pounds of food aid since 1989. http://www.FeedingAmericaWestMichigan.org

Katherina M. Rosqueta is the founding executive director of the Center for High Impact Philanthropy at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Social Policy & Practice. The center identifies strategies for donors to get the biggest bang for their buck. http://www.impact.upenn.edu


Canned food drives are a shocking
waste of resources

Forget the canned goods - donate money!

http://360blog.net/article/forget-canned-goods-donate-money 

Once you think about it for a minute, a canned food drive is silly. Charities can buy food in bulk, often at an extra discount because they are charities. How much do you think a food drive would pay per can of tuna fish when they buy it by the pallet, versus the price you pay at the store?
The very idea of collecting cans of food, then employing the person power to sort, pack, transport and distribute them out to the poor, is ridiculous. It's a colossal waste of time, energy and funds. And yet we go through this pantomime every year, particularly in the wake of disasters and in the lead-up to the holiday season.

In fact, Slate's Matthew Yglesias has crunched the numbers. "You would be doing dramatically more good […] by eating that can of tuna yourself and forking over a check for half the price of a single can of Chicken of the Sea."

Now granted, many of us get roped into canned food drives at work, where there is social pressure to donate. No one wants to look like a stingy jerk. Go ahead and drop a few cans in there if you feel that you need to in order to save face with your coworkers.


But as a rule, canned food drives should be abolished. The inefficiency alone is devastating. But worse, participating in a canned food drive makes people feel like they have their charity bases covered. "Why donate money? I left two cans of pumpkin puree in the box at work." 

Cash is the most efficient way to donate to a charity. Every charity can put your money to good use. Better use, in most cases, than you could yourself. It doesn't require a whole bevy of volunteers and trucks to handle your check, and it's a lot easier than scooping through your pantry for a bunch of almost-expired canned garbanzo beans that no one's going to want to eat anyway.

Financial donations - even a few dollars at a time - also can be put to a much wider variety of uses. They can cover fuel costs for delivery trucks, help keep the lights on in the warehouse, and provide all sorts of other assistance (like help with electricity and phone bills) for the people the charity is helping. 

This year, skip the canned food drive: just give them a few bucks, instead.


- See more at: http://360blog.net/article/forget-canned-goods-donate-money#sthash.HPYlYIu3.dpuf

 

Canned food drives are a shocking waste of resources

In fact, Slate's Matthew Yglesias has crunched the numbers. "You would be doing dramatically more good […] by eating that can of tuna yourself and forking over a check for half the price of a single can of Chicken of the Sea."

Now granted, many of us get roped into canned food drives at work, where there is social pressure to donate. No one wants to look like a stingy jerk. Go ahead and drop a few cans in there if you feel that you need to in order to save face with your coworkers.

But as a rule, canned food drives should be abolished. The inefficiency alone is devastating. But worse, participating in a canned food drive makes people feel like they have their charity bases covered. "Why donate money? I left two cans of pumpkin puree in the box at work."

Cash is the most efficient way to donate to a charity. Every charity can put your money to good use. Better use, in most cases, than you c


 

First Bus Tour in Jan.

FREE Summer meals

Vernon HAT members

Vernon's Mobile Foodshare locations

Cornerstone Foundation, Inc.

HVCC

Iglesia Fuente de Salvación Misionera de Rockville

Meals on Wheels Visiting Nurses

What is FOOD SECURITY?

Obesity Trends

 

 
 

 

   
 


Vernon HAT members

Cornerstone Foundation, Inc.

Emergency Responders

End Hunger CT!

Foodshare

HVCC

KidSafeCT CT

Maple St. School

Rockville Church of the Nazarene

Rockville Community Alliance

Rockville United Methodist Church

Stop & Shop

Union Church

Vernon Community Network

Vernon Public Schools Food Services

Vernon School Readiness Council

Vernon Youth Services Bureau

WIC

 

 

   
 

 

Mobile Foodshare

Greater Vernon's Mobile Foodshare locations


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A BRIEF HISTORY

Mobile Foodshare first began in 2001 when we recognized a need to efficiently distribute increasingly large amounts of donated produce.  The rapid delivery program uses converted beverage trucks to bring perishable food items such as highly nutritious fruits and vegetables to people in low income neighborhoods who need it most. Sites are hosted by a Foodshare partner and operated with help from a dedicated corps of volunteers.  

We received an overwhelmingly positive response from site coordinators and the community members being served.  The program grew quickly, expanding from one truck to two in 5 short years – one of the trucks even has refrigerated compartments allowing us to provide dietary staples like meat, yogurts, and other dairy items.

 With more than sixty sites up and running by 2011, the Mobile Foodshare program appeared to have reached capacity. Always looking to be economical, we recruited the help of a UPS Routing System to coordinate all of the daily routing of our deliveries and pick-ups. This move created the potential for 20 new sites!

 Last year, Foodshare distributed more than 3.5 million pounds of primarily produce through 1,367 distributions hosted by 62 Mobile Foodshare sites operating on an every-other week rotation. Overall attendance increased by nearly 18%, with an average of 130 attendees each receiving 21 pounds of assistance per distribution. The high-water mark was reached on Friday, August 24, 2012 when 1,333 attendees were served at six Mobile Foodshare sites visited by our two vehicles – at St. Augustine alone, 428 individuals received assistance!

WHO IS ELIGIBLE?

The Mobile Foodshare program provides easy access to fresh fruits and vegetables for both individuals and families in need. While “need” is generally defined as having a gross annual income at or below 235% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), registration is not required for the majority of sites. The occasional exception includes sites which are located in census tracts indicating the majority of residents do not meet this definition of “need.” In these instances, the host organization conducts an annual “Snapshot Screening” to determine eligibility.

THE FUTURE OF MOBILE FOODSHARE

Foodshare has focused on establishing Mobile Foodshare sites in rural and suburban areas as research indicates that the rate of poverty is increasing faster and the number of bricks-and-mortar pantries are fewer there than in urban areas. Foodshare added three new sites in Tolland County in 2011 (Andover, Coventry, and Somers) and another three last year  (Ellington, Mansfield, and Tolland). The addition of these six sites served to increase overall Mobile attendance in Tolland County by 65% as compared to 2010. Last year Foodshare also established new sites in East Windsor, Rocky Hill, South Windsor, Suffield, and West Hartford.

Foodshare has seen a 46% increase in the amount of healthy, nutritious food distributed through the program. Many sites even hand out recipe cards offering ways to prepare product provided through the program. While these efforts are helping to fill the gap for those in need, Foodshare is still focused on collaboration with site hosts to connect attendees with other available programs like SNAP, WIC, and HUSKY. Over the next 3-5 years, we hope to increase the number of sites offering SNAP outreach services. We’re also interested in expanding the program to include sites in towns where Foodshare does not currently have a community partner – Berlin, Bolton, Columbia, Hartland and Union.
 
Do you know of an organization in an underserved neighborhood, with the resources – space and volunteers – to host a Mobile Foodshare site? Help us grow this successful program by contacting George Lombardo at 860-286-9999.

 

Below is a list of towns served by Mobile Foodshare. Click on the town where you live to find the nearest distribution site, along with dates and times that food is given out. Please remember to bring a bag or box with you to carry your food. Newcomers may be asked to complete a brief form verifying income and need for assistance.

 
Mobile Foodshare is an outdoor food distribution for persons of low income. The food choices vary from week to week but usually include bread and several types of fresh produce. Other items may also be offered depending on availability. Check out our healthy recipes utilizing produce offered at our Mobile Foodshare sites.

 
If you have any questions please call Foodshare at 860-286-9999.

 


 Greater Vernon area schedule:

 

Vernon and Rockville

2013

February 14, 28
March 14, 28
April 11, 25
May 9, 23
June 6, 20
July 18
August 1, 15, 29
September 12, 26
October 10, 24
November 7, 21
December 5,
19

 Cornerstone Foundation - Every other Thursday 10:15 - 10:45

  3 Prospect Street (Map it)

  Entrance at 6 Cottage Street

 *Winter Location at St. Bernard Church parking lot (Map it) 25 St. Bernard's Terrace

 

  Park West Apartments - Every other Thursday 11:15 - 11:45

  178 Terrace Drive (Map it)


Tolland & Ellington

2013

June 13, 27
July 11, 25
August 8, 22
September 5, 19
October 3, 17, 31
November 14

December 12, 26


Tolland

United Congregational Church of Tolland - Every other Thursday 9:00 - 9:30

45 Tolland Green  (Map it)

 

 

Ellington

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints - Every other Thursday 10:00 - 10:30

2 Maple Street  (Map it


  For other Greater Hartford Area Mobile Foodshare locations, click here.

 

   
   
 

Cornerstone Foundation, Inc.

www.cornerstone-rockville.org

Feeding the Hungry, Clothing the Naked, Sheltering the Homeless (Isaiah 58:6-7)

Soup Kitchen Youth Center Clothing Bank  Shelter
(860) 871-1823 (860) 870-0500    (860) 870-0500  (860) 875-6343

                                        

Cornerstone Soup Kitchen at 15 Prospect Street, Rockville, CT

     Soup Kitchen Hours

Monday - Friday         Lunch at 11:30 am,  Dinner at 5:00 pm
Saturday & Sunday     Lunch at 11:30 am

 

 

Hockanum Valley Community Council

www.hvcchelps.org 

HVCC Basic Needs program provides assistance to individuals and families in a manner which promotes independence while assuring basic needs are met in a dignified manner, regardless of ability to pay, to prevent hunger and homelessness.

Programs offered:

  • Food, fresh produce, and bread items are available at the Food Pantry based on family size.
  • Before- and after-school children's snack program.
  • Workshops on topics to improve quality of life for low income families.
  • Referrals to energy assistance programs.
  • Food, clothing and household items provided to victims of fire or abuse to set up new households.

The HVCC Food Pantry is an emergency food source for residents of Vernon, Tolland, and Ellington, South Windsor and Coventry. The food is free to individuals who meet income and residency requirements. The Pantry is located at 29 Naek Road, Suite 5C

Food Pantry Hours

Monday 9 -12
Tuesday 10-1 and 5-7
Wednesday 9-1 and 4-6
Thursday 9-1
Friday 9-12
Closed Saturday and Sunday

The HVCC Food Pantry helps families and individuals in the Vernon, Ellington, and the Tolland, South Windsor and Coventry area by providing food assistance. Food drives are a major source of the contributions that fill the shelves of the Pantry. We are most grateful to the many individuals, schools, businesses, and religious and civic organizations that participate in food drives to support the Pantry. We also always welcome donations of food from individuals and families who understand the importance of helping their neighbors.

The HVCC Pantry is always in need of the following:

Non-perishable food items, such as peanut butter, jelly, canned tuna, pasta and sauce, cereal, boxes of macaroni and cheese, canned spaghetti or ravioli, canned or dry soup, canned vegetables, and canned fruit.

Beverages, including juice boxes, bottled juice, and dry or powdered milk.

Household items and toiletries, such as toilet paper, paper towels, plastic wrap, soap, toothpaste, and shampoo.

Please note that donations should be in cans, boxes, plastic containers, or other sealed packages. We also ask that you check the expiration date of your donations. We cannot accept any items past their expiration date.

Donations may be brought to the HVCC Pantry (at 29 Naek Road in Vernon) during its normal hours. If the Pantry is closed, you may bring items to the Administrative office which is located behind the Pantry. The normal office hours are Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and Friday 8:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

If you wish to find out how you can hold a food drive, call us at 860-872-7727.

No donation is too small and all donations are greatly appreciated!

Information for our clients:

  • Food is distributed on a first come, first served basis and will be distributed as equitably as possible based on the items on hand and the size of the family.
  • To be eligible to receive food from the Pantry, you must live in Vernon, Tolland, or Ellington and meet income requirements.
  • To determine if you meet eligibility requirements, please call 860-872-9825 and ask to speak to a case manager. The case manager will set up an intake meeting with you to determine your eligibility.
  • Please bring the following items with you to your intake meeting:
    • Proof of address (utility bill, state-issued ID)
    • Proof of income of all household members
    • Social Security cards for all household members
    • Photo ID
  • You may obtain food from the pantry once every 30 days. In addition, you may obtain limited, additional food support (e.g., produce, bread, pasta, soup, etc.) once a week in the other three weeks of the month.
  • You must bring your own bags to the Pantry to carry out your food.

Iglesia Fuente de Salvación Misionera de Rockville

 http://ifsmrockville.org

Food Pantry; open every other Wednesday, 9 am - 1 pm

La Iglesia Fuente de Salvacion Misionera Inc. M.I. junto a sus Pastores Jose Y Enid DeJesus les da una bienvenida a nuestra pagina, en la cual creemos que le sera de bendición atraves de nuestros recursos y herramientas que proveemos en la misma. 

La Iglesia esta ubicada en 116 Union Street en Rockville, CT 06066. Nuestro numero telefonico es (860).872.8461. Les pedimos que se unan a nosotros en adoración y en un mismo Espiritu, para asi exaltar al Dios altisimo, y ofrecerle lo mejor de nuestra adoración atraves de nuestras programaciones.

 


Meals on Wheels 

What is Meals on Wheels?

A program designed to meet the dietary needs of individuals whose physical, emotional or social conditions handicap their ability to obtain or prepare meals for themselves. Meals on Wheels volunteers deliver one hot meal and one cold meal directly to your home five days a week, including holidays.

Visiting Nurse & Health Services of Connecticut’s meals are prepared by CW Resources of New Britain, CT. Should your physician recommend a special diet (such as diabetic, low salt, renal, or any diet specific to your individual needs) you can still enjoy Meals on Wheels.

Starting Service

Services can begin as soon as 24 hours after your initial call. Weekend meals are available to be delivered on Friday.

Available to Residents of:
  • Andover
  • Bolton
  • Columbia
  • Coventry
  • East Hartford
  • East Windsor
  • Ellington
  • Manchester
  • North Windham
  • South Windsor
  • Tolland
  • Vernon
  • Willimantic

To begin receiving Meals on Wheels, please call (860) 872-9163, ext. 2367.

Visiting Nurse & Health Services of Connecticut, Inc.
8 Keynote Drive - Vernon, Connecticut 06066
(860) 872-9163

 


Crystal Lake Community Food Pantry-Community United Methodist

Provides a food pantry. Serves Resident of Ellington, Stafford. Documentation Required: Proof of income, Proof of expenses (rent, telephone and utility bill statements), Proof of residence

Food Pantry hours: Monday: 11am-12pm * Important: Please call to confirm that the hours. 

Donations And Volunteers

Please contact us directly by phone to donate and/or volunteer.

Ellington, CT 06029
860-872-0798




 

   
 

 

What is Food Security?

Food Insecurity: Limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods or limited or uncertain ability to acquire acceptable food sin socially acceptable ways.

Food Hardship: lack of money to purchase food

 

 

“Food Security”

From Forum held on Monday, March 14, 2011

Hungry in Vernon?

Do you have neighbors who don’t know where to get their next meal? Are kids coming to school hungry? Come to this forum to listen, learn and participate in finding solutions.  Programs exist, federal dollars are available but are we as a community doing everything we can to make Vernon hunger free?

Sponsored by:
- Vernon Community Network
- End Hunger Connecticut!
- Foodshare

Hosted by:
- Rockville Church of the Nazarene
       47 East Street – Rockville, CT  

click picture above to see presentation

March 14-2011-Hunger in Vernon-PowerPoint

This PowerPoint presentation was created by Sarah Santora of Foodshare with input from
Dawn Crayco of End Hunger CT! and Monica Pacheco from Vernon Public Schools.

Following this 30-minute presentation, a panel discussion was held to answer questions
and solicit input for improving the resources within the community.

 

 

Obesity Trends

 

 

   
 

 

 

Food Distribution Programs:


Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP)

CSFP works to improve the health of low-income pregnant and breastfeeding women, other new mothers up to one year postpartum, infants, children up to age six, and elderly people at least 60 years of age by supplementing their diets with nutritious USDA commodity foods. It provides food and administrative funds to States to supplement the diets of these groups.


Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR)

FDPIR is a Federal program that provides commodity foods to low-income households, including the elderly, living on Indian reservations, and to Native American families residing in designated areas near reservations.


The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP)

Under TEFAP, commodity foods are made available by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to States. States provide the food to local agencies that they have selected, usually food banks, which in turn, distribute the food to soup kitchens and food pantries that directly serve the public


Child Nutrition Programs :

Initiatives


Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

USDA’s Child and Adult Care Food Program plays a vital role in improving the quality of day care and making it more affordable for many low-income families. Each day, 2.6 million children receive nutritious meals and snacks through CACFP. The program also provides meals and snacks to 74,000 adults who receive care in nonresidential adult day care centers. CACFP reaches even further to provide meals to children residing in homeless shelters, and snacks and suppers to youths participating in eligible afterschool care programs.


Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP)

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program provides free fresh fruits and vegetables in selected low-income elementary schools nationwide. The purpose of the Program is to increase children’s fresh fruit and vegetable consumption and at the same time combat childhood obesity by improving children’s overall diet and create healthier eating habits to impact their present and future health.


National School Lunch Program (NSLP)

School districts and independent schools that choose to take part in the lunch program get cash subsidies and donated commodities from the USDA for each meal they serve. In return, they must serve lunches that meet Federal requirements, and they must offer free or reduced price lunches to eligible children. School food authorities can also be reimbursed for snacks served to children through age 18 in afterschool educational or enrichment programs.


School Breakfast Program (SBP)

The School Breakfast Program operates in the same manner as the National School Lunch Program. School districts and independent schools that choose to take part in the breakfast program receive cash subsidies from the USDA for each meal they serve. In return, they must serve breakfasts that meet Federal requirements, and they must offer free or reduced price breakfasts to eligible children.


Special Milk Program (SMP)

Participating schools and institutions receive reimbursement from the USDA for each half pint of milk served. They must operate their milk programs on a non-profit basis. They agree to use the Federal reimbursement to reduce the selling price of milk to all children.


Summer Food Service Program (SFSP)

SFSP is the single largest Federal resource available for local sponsors who want to combine a feeding program with a summer activity program. Children in your community do not need to go hungry this summer. During the school year, nutritious meals are available through the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. But those programs end when school ends for the summer. The Summer Food Service Program helps fill the hunger gap.


Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs (SNAP)

SNAP (formerly the Food Stamp Program) puts healthy food within reach for 28 million people each month via an EBT card used to purchase food at most grocery stores. Through nutrition education partners, SNAP helps clients learn to make healthy eating and active lifestyle choices.


Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children - better known as the WIC Program - serves to safeguard the health of low-income women, infants, & children up to age 5 who are at nutritional risk by providing nutritious foods to supplement diets, information on healthy eating, and referrals to health care.


Farmers' Market Nutrition Program (FMNP)

The WIC Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program (FMNP) provides fresh, unprepared, locally grown fruits and vegetables from local farmers' markets to Women, Infants and Children (WIC) recipients


Senior Farmers' Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP)

The Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program awards grants to States, United States territories, and federally-recognized Indian tribal governments to provide low-income seniors with coupons that can be exchanged for eligible foods at farmers’ markets, roadside stands, and community supported agriculture programs.

 

   
   

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Emerson_Good_Samaritan_Act_of_1996 

Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Act of 1996

The Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act (Pub.L. 104–210, 110 Stat. 3011, enacted October 1, 1996) was created to encourage food donation to nonprofits by minimizing liability, in accordance with the Model Good Samaritan Food Donation Act. Signed into law by President Bill Clinton, this law, named after Rep. Bill Emerson (who encouraged the proposal but died before it was passed), makes it easier to donate food by allowing donor liability only in cases of gross negligence.

Though a helpful and visionary law, little has been done to promote or implement the law and generally it has languished in obscurity.[1]


 

P.L. 104-210 (October 1, 1996) was named in honor of the late Congressman who was a champion of efforts to expand food donations to the poor and to protect those who make donations. It converts the Model Good Samaritan Food Donation Act to permanent law and incorporates it into the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 (section 22). Good Samaritan laws are designed to encourage the donation of food and groceries to nonprofit charitable agencies by minimizing the risks of legal actions against donors and distributors of foods. The 1996 amendments exclude from civil or criminal liability a person or nonprofit food organization that, in good faith, donates or distributes donated foods for food relief. The new law does not supersede state or local health regulations and its protections do not apply to an injury or death due to gross neglect or intentional misconduct.


 

Millions of pound of food and groceries go to waste each year. To encourage companies and organizations to donate healthy food that would otherwise go to waste, they are protected from criminal and civil liability under the Good Samaritan Food Donation Act.

The Federal Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act

On October 1, 1996, President Clinton signed this act to encourage donation of food and grocery products to non-profit organizations for distribution to  individuals in need. This law:

  * Protects you from liability when you donate to a non-profit organization;

  * Protects you from civil and criminal liability should the product donated in good faith later cause harm to the recipient;

  * Standardizes donor liability exposure. You or your legal counsel do not need to investigate liability laws in 50 states; and

  * Sets a floor of "gross negligence" or intentional misconduct for persons who donate grocery products. According to the new law, gross negligence is defined as "voluntary and conscious conduct by a person with knowledge (at the time of conduct) that the conduct is likely to be harmful to the health or well-being of another person."

The text of the bill itself follows:

  The Bill Emerson Food Donation Act

  One Hundred Fourth Congress of the United States of America

  At the Second Session

Begun and held at the City of Washington on Wednesday, the third day of January, one thousand nine hundred and ninety-six.

An Act

To encourage the donation of food and grocery products to nonprofit organizations for distribution to needy individuals by giving the Model Good Samaritan Food Donation Act the full force and effect of law.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

Section 1. CONVERSION TO PERMANENT LAW OD MODEL GOOD SAMARITAN FOOD DONATION ACT AND TRANSFER OF THAT ACT TO CHILD NUTRITION ACT OF 1966.

  (a) Conversion to Permanent Law. -- Title IV of the National and Community Service Act of 1990 is amended --

    1. by striking the title heading and sections 401 and 403 (42 U.S.C. 12671 and 12673); and

    2. in section 402 (42 U.S.C. 12672) --

  (A) in the section heading, by striking "model" and inserting "bill emerson"

  (B) in subsection (a), by striking "Good Samaritan" and inserting "Bill Emerson Good Samaritan:"

  (C) in subsection (b)(7), to read as follows:

  "(7) GROSS NEGLIGENCE. -- The term 'gross negligence' means voluntary and conscious conduct (including a failure to act) by a person who, at the time of the conduct, knew that the conduct was likely to be harmful to the health or well-being of another person.";

  (D) by striking subsection (c) and inserting the following:

  "(c) LIABILITY FOR DAMAGES FROM DONATED FOOD AND GROCERY PRODUCTS.

  "(1) LIABILITY OF PERSON OR GLEANER. -- A person or gleaner shall not be subject to civil or criminal liability arising from the nature, age, packaging, or condition of apparently wholesome food or an apparently fit grocery product that the person or gleaner donates in good faith to a nonprofit organization for ultimate distribution to needy individuals.

  "(2) LIABILITY OF NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION. -- A nonprofit organization shall not be subject to civil or criminal liability arising from the nature, age, packaging, or condition of apparently wholesome food or an apparently fit grocery product that the nonprofit organization received as a donation in good faith from a person or gleaner for ultimate distribution to needy individuals.

  "(3) EXCEPTION. -- Paragraphs (1) and (2) shall not apply to an injury to or death of an ultimate user or recipient of the food or grocery product that results from an act or omission of the person, gleaner or nonprofit organization, as applicable, constituting gross negligence or intentional misconduct."; and

  (E) in subsection (f), by adding at the end the following: "Nothing in this section shall be construed to supersede State or local health regulations.".

  (b) TRANSFER TO CHILD NUTRITION ACT OF 1966. -- Section 402 of the National and Community Service Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12762) (as amended by subsection (a))

    1. is transferred from the National and Community Service Act of 1990 to the Child Nutrition Act of 1966;

    2. is redesignated as section 22 of the Child Nutrition Act of 1966; and

    3. is added at the end of such Act.

  (c) CONFORMING AMENDMENT. -- The table of contents for the National and Community Service Act of 1990 is amended by striking the items relating to title IV.

Newt Gingrich
Speaker of the House of Representatives

Strom Thurmond
President of the Senate Pro Tempore

Approved 10/01/96

William J. Clinton
President of the United States
P.L. 104-210


42 USC § 1791 - Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act

(a) Short title
This section may be cited as the “Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act”.
(b) Definitions
As used in this section:
(1) Apparently fit grocery product
The term “apparently fit grocery product” means a grocery product that meets all quality and labeling standards imposed by Federal, State, and local laws and regulations even though the product may not be readily marketable due to appearance, age, freshness, grade, size, surplus, or other conditions.
(2) Apparently wholesome food
The term “apparently wholesome food” means food that meets all quality and labeling standards imposed by Federal, State, and local laws and regulations even though the food may not be readily marketable due to appearance, age, freshness, grade, size, surplus, or other conditions.
(3) Donate
The term “donate” means to give without requiring anything of monetary value from the recipient, except that the term shall include giving by a nonprofit organization to another nonprofit organization, notwithstanding that the donor organization has charged a nominal fee to the donee organization, if the ultimate recipient or user is not required to give anything of monetary value.
(4) Food
The term “food” means any raw, cooked, processed, or prepared edible substance, ice, beverage, or ingredient used or intended for use in whole or in part for human consumption.
(5) Gleaner
The term “gleaner” means a person who harvests for free distribution to the needy, or for donation to a nonprofit organization for ultimate distribution to the needy, an agricultural crop that has been donated by the owner.
(6) Grocery product
The term “grocery product” means a nonfood grocery product, including a disposable paper or plastic product, household cleaning product, laundry detergent, cleaning product, or miscellaneous household item.
(7) Gross negligence
The term “gross negligence” means voluntary and conscious conduct (including a failure to act) by a person who, at the time of the conduct, knew that the conduct was likely to be harmful to the health or well-being of another person.
(8) Intentional misconduct
The term “intentional misconduct” means conduct by a person with knowledge (at the time of the conduct) that the conduct is harmful to the health or well-being of another person.
(9) Nonprofit organization
The term “nonprofit organization” means an incorporated or unincorporated entity that—
(A) is operating for religious, charitable, or educational purposes; and
(B) does not provide net earnings to, or operate in any other manner that inures to the benefit of, any officer, employee, or shareholder of the entity.
(10) Person
The term “person” means an individual, corporation, partnership, organization, association, or governmental entity, including a retail grocer, wholesaler, hotel, motel, manufacturer, restaurant, caterer, farmer, and nonprofit food distributor or hospital. In the case of a corporation, partnership, organization, association, or governmental entity, the term includes an officer, director, partner, deacon, trustee, council member, or other elected or appointed individual responsible for the governance of the entity.
(c) Liability for damages from donated food and grocery products
(1) Liability of person or gleaner
A person or gleaner shall not be subject to civil or criminal liability arising from the nature, age, packaging, or condition of apparently wholesome food or an apparently fit grocery product that the person or gleaner donates in good faith to a nonprofit organization for ultimate distribution to needy individuals.
(2) Liability of nonprofit organization
A nonprofit organization shall not be subject to civil or criminal liability arising from the nature, age, packaging, or condition of apparently wholesome food or an apparently fit grocery product that the nonprofit organization received as a donation in good faith from a person or gleaner for ultimate distribution to needy individuals.
(3) Exception
Paragraphs (1) and (2) shall not apply to an injury to or death of an ultimate user or recipient of the food or grocery product that results from an act or omission of the person, gleaner, or nonprofit organization, as applicable, constituting gross negligence or intentional misconduct.
(d) Collection or gleaning of donations
A person who allows the collection or gleaning of donations on property owned or occupied by the person by gleaners, or paid or unpaid representatives of a nonprofit organization, for ultimate distribution to needy individuals shall not be subject to civil or criminal liability that arises due to the injury or death of the gleaner or representative, except that this paragraph shall not apply to an injury or death that results from an act or omission of the person constituting gross negligence or intentional misconduct.
(e) Partial compliance
If some or all of the donated food and grocery products do not meet all quality and labeling standards imposed by Federal, State, and local laws and regulations, the person or gleaner who donates the food and grocery products shall not be subject to civil or criminal liability in accordance with this section if the nonprofit organization that receives the donated food or grocery products—
(1) is informed by the donor of the distressed or defective condition of the donated food or grocery products;
(2) agrees to recondition the donated food or grocery products to comply with all the quality and labeling standards prior to distribution; and
(3) is knowledgeable of the standards to properly recondition the donated food or grocery product.
(f) Construction
This section shall not be construed to create any liability. Nothing in this section shall be construed to supercede State or local health regulations.

 

   
 
http://www.scribd.com/doc/154106126/Food-Funder-Compass-Navigating-Your-Path-to-Impact

Food Funder Compass: Navigating Your Path to Impact

 

 

 

 

   

How do I join or help start a Hunger Action Team (HAT)

A Hunger Action Team is a group of individuals and organizations working in collaboration to end hunger in a designated community. Members include individuals struggling with hunger, local businesses and food donors, town government, nonprofit organizations, the faith community, the school system, and concerned individuals.


They begin by asking “Why people are hungry in our town and what can we do to make it better?”
What are the obligations of a team member?


Team members meet on a regular basis, usually monthly, for one to two hours. They discuss issues and obstacles that keep people from getting the help they need. They determine steps to solve these issues and take on action steps to work on between meetings. Each member determines how much time they have to contribute aside from meetings and pick action steps based on their desire and ability. Team members typically do work outside of meetings from an average of one hour to ten hours per month.

What are some of the things HATS have done so far?

  • Bloomfield HAT started a backpack program so kids could bring home food for the weekend and a
    “grab & go” breakfast program.
  • Vernon HAT helped to start two new Summer Meals programs for kids.
  • Enfield HAT created the first Summer Meal program, called the Lunch Bunch, to provide meals for kids and later increased kids’ participation by also providing meals for parents.
  • Farmington Valley HAT collaborated with the Community Farm of Simsbury to provide fresh produce to area food pantries.


Where are the Hunger Action Teams located?


Active Teams:

Bloomfield
Bristol
East Hartford
Enfield
Farmington Valley (Avon, Canton, Farmington and Simsbury)
Plainville
Vernon
West Hartford
Windsor

Re-establishing Team(s):

New Britain

New Teams forming in:

Hartford’s Asylum Hill neighborhood
Hartford’s Northeast neighborhood
Stafford and Union
Willington and Mansfield


Further information please contact one of our Community Network Builders:


Beatrice Maslowski at bmaslowski@foodshare.org or 860-286-9999, x180 

Jim Palma at jpalma@foodshare.org  or 860-286-9999 x124

 

   

 

 


The Vernon Community Network is a collaboration of providers that will identify and coordinate Social Service, 
Health, Educational and Economic Development resources for the enhancement of the community.

 

community service/volunteer opportunities as listed by Rockville High School

Click here for the contact information and membership of the Vernon Community Network

VCN-MEMBERSHIP_APPLICATION-2014-15.pdf  

Teri Rogers, VCN President   888/566-4161   tslingback@comcast.net

 Mailing address: Vernon Community Network     c/o KIDSAFE CT     19 Elm Street   Rockville, CT  06066



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